Sorry To Bother You (2018)

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In an alternate reality Oakland, Cash Green is a regular dude, struggling to get by. With no money, and few prospects, he takes a job in telemarketing, where he quickly learns that he’s far more likely to sell products if he uses his “white voice.” Doing so allows him to climb the corporate ladder, eventually getting promoted to the position of “power caller,” meaning he gets to sell weapons of mass destruction to dictators. All this success puts him into conflict with his girlfriend, Detroit, and co-workers, Sal and Squeeze, who want the telemarketers to unionize, and fear that Cash is selling out. Things only get worse when the head of WorryFree, a company that turns people into slaves by forcing them to sign life-long contracts, comes to Cash’s door with a frightening proposal.
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Death Note (2017)

While doing other people’s homework, angry nerd Light Turner stumbles across a mysterious book with the words “Death Note” written on it. And by “stumbled,” I mean it falls from the sky, and hits him on the head. Anyway, when he opens it, a strange, spiky-faced demon named Ryuk appears before him, and explains that if Light writes a person’s name in the book, and pictures their face while doing so, he’ll be able to kill the unlucky soul. Realizing that this gives him virtually unlimited power, Light uses the book to kill off bullies, murderers and terrorists, eventually creating a god-like persona for himself called Kira. Some people love him, since he’s basically ridding the world of evil. Others hate him, since he’s essentially deciding who is worthy of life and who isn’t. Either way, the police, led by an eccentric detective called L, are brought in, and begin investigating Kira’s identity. This puts the pressure on Light, and his bloodthirsty girlfriend, Mia, who start to realize that, shock of all shocks, maybe killing people off indiscriminately is bad. Continue reading

Straight Outta Compton (2015)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

In 1986, Eric Wright is a drug dealer, Andre Young is an aspiring DJ, and Oshea Jackson is a wannabe rapper. They’re all poor, they’re all disillusioned, and they all have a long way to go before becoming Eazy-E, Dr. Dre, and Ice Cube. But they’re talented, and driven, and have a unique voice that they know will speak to millions. So they decide, “screw it,” and form their own record label, Ruthless Records, and start their own rap group, NWA. When the first song they put out, “Boyz N The Hood,” becomes a local hit, they are approached by an agent named Jerry, who offers to “make them legit,” if only they will make him their manager. They agree, and Jerry keeps his word, giving them greater exposure, and booking them in bigger venues. But rifts quickly form within the group over payment, and it’s not long before Ice Cube breaks off, and a vicious rivalry between him and his former band mates flares up.

Straight Outta Compton is a film I don’t feel fully qualified to judge. I didn’t grow up with NWA’s music, I’m not Black, and I wasn’t alive at the time this movie is set. So I don’t really feel I can comment on the picture’s historical accuracy, or on the way it portrays Rap culture. What I can comment on is the filmmaking itself–the writing, the acting, the production design–and that is very impressive. All the actors do terrific jobs, the camerawork is smooth, and the story is consistently entertaining. From a purely technical standpoint, I have but a few complaints, and those that I do have are relatively mild. The film is almost three hours long, and there are points where the pacing does drag. There are also some scenes that never get brought up again, like one on a bus where a gang member says “remember me” to a passenger, and another one in a hotel room involving a guy looking for his girlfriend. And the film doesn’t do much in the way of female representation, with most of the women in the picture being groupies, and the others being worried moms, or supportive girlfriends. But, again, I’m not a part of that culture, so I can’t comment on the misogyny that might very well have been a huge part of that time period, and that scene.

All in all, though, I quite enjoyed Straight Outta Compton, and would recommend it to you. If your a fan of NWA, or are just looking for a good biopic, check this film out. I’m quite certain you won’t regret doing so.

Get Out (2017)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is the Name, And Views Are My Game.

Chris and Rose are in love. They’ve been going out for close to five months, and they’re about to make one of the biggest steps in their relationship, meeting each other’s parents. This, of course, is nerve-wracking for everyone, but the situation is made doubly awkward by the fact that Rose’s family, who are White, don’t know that Chris is Black. Chris informs Rose of his concerns, and she tells him that there’s nothing to worry about. Her family are nice. They’ll love him. Chris isn’t convinced, having spent a lifetime facing micro aggressions from “nice” people, but he goes along anyway. And, at first, everything is fine. Rose’s family are nice, micro aggressions not withstanding. They do seem to like him. But, as time goes by, Chris starts to notice some things that aren’t quite right. The family’s Black servants, Georgina and Walter, are inhumanly polite and docile, almost as though they’ve had their personalities drained. And Rose’s mother, Missy, a psychiatrist, is strangely adamant about submitting Chris to hypnosis. Tension builds as the family’s friends, each one whiter and more oblivious than the last, show up for an annual get together, and submit Chris to a tidal wave of awkward statements and pho compliments. Finally, Chris decides he can take it no more, and tells Rose that they need to leave, but, much to his horror, finds that he can’t.

Get Out is a movie that I really didn’t know what to expect with. The premise seemed interesting, and I liked the actors I recognized in the trailer, like Skins’ Daniel Kaluuya, and Being John Malkovich’s Catherine Keener. At the same time, though, I was worried that the film’s social commentary would wind up being too heavy-handed, and I didn’t know how successful a comedian, Jordan Peele, would be at directing a horror movie. Amazingly successful, as it turns out, because this movie is AWESOME! It’s well-acted, well-written, ripe with tension, and manages to deftly ride the line between humorous and horrifying, and all while subtly making its viewers aware of their own innate prejudices. I’m not joking when I say that at no less than four points in this movie, me and everyone else in my theater cheered with delight at something that just happened. It’s rare for a film to impact me on such a visceral level, and I’ve got to give it up to Jordan Peele, the cast, and everyone involved for making a film that got to me the way this one did. But by far the best part of this entire movie was Lil Rel Howery, whom plays Chris’s best friend, Rod. I’m not joking when I say that he stole EVERy scene he was in. There wasn’t a moment he was on screen where I wasn’t laughing my butt off. He NEEDS to be in more stuff, because he is AWESOME. Something else I want to give Get Out credit for is the fact that I legitimately had no idea where it was going. When I finally learned what was happening beneath the surface, I actually turned to my girlfriend and said “Shit! I did not see that coming.” And she actually said to me afterwards, “You need to write stories like that; stories where you can’t guess what’s going on.”

Guys, what else can I say? Get Out is awesome. It’s smart, funny, scary, and an amazing directorial debut from Jordan Peele. Give it a look!