Pirates of the Caribbean 5 (2017)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

Years have past in the Pirates of the Caribbean universe. Will and Elizabeth’s son, Henry, has grown up, and is now looking for a way to lift his father’s curse. Captain Barbosa has become the world’s wealthiest pirate, commanding a massive fleet, and wearing fine silks and jewelry. And Captain Jack Sparrow? Oh, Captain Jack Sparrow. Captain Jack Sparrow has become a washed up parody of his former self, unable to walk straight, let alone raid, pillage and plunder. But things aren’t over for any of them just yet, as a young astronomer, Karina, appears, claiming to know where Poseidon’s Trident is hidden. And if that weren’t enough to keep everyone on their toes, an evil ghost, Captain Salazar, emerges from the Devil’s Triangle, looking to exact vengeance on a certain dreadlocked buffoon. (Gee, I wonder which one).

The best way for me to describe Pirates of The Caribbean 5 is like this; it’s not groundbreaking, but it is enjoyable, and I don’t regret going to see it. Like Alien: Covenant, Pirates 5 sticks to its franchise’s formula–young lover’s on a quest, aided by Captain Jack, hunted by some supernatural monster–and boasts some cool sets, some impressive effects, and some super fun action. Neither one pushes the envelope that hard, or possesses very original, or fleshed out, characters. But unlike Alien: Covenant, which is considerably darker, and doesn’t have much humor in it, Pirates has a much lighter tone, and features a lot more jokes. Granted, some of those jokes don’t land. But, for the most part, the lighter tone and greater emphasis on slapstick won me over. Like I said, I don’t regret having taken a few hours out of my day to see this movie, and I kind of do with Alien: Covenant. That says something.

Now, before you get the wrong idea, I don’t think this picture is flawless. The jokes don’t always land, there are way too many side characters, and I don’t like the way the script portrayed Captain Jack. In the first few films, he behaved like an idiot, but you kind of got the sense he was putting on an act. It was almost like he was trying to convince everyone he was a fool, so that they wouldn’t expect it when he pulled off an impossible escape, or beat fifty guys in a sword fight. In this movie, though, he really does come off as an idiot, and whenever he does something, it honestly feels like he just got lucky. That’s sad. Captain Jack was one of my favorite movie heroes growing up, and I don’t like seeing him neutered like this. At least Wolverine got to go out with a bang.

Guys, all I can say is this; Pirates of the Caribbean 5 is harmless fun. Its got some good humor, and some very creative action scenes. You probably won’t remember it, but I don’t think you’ll regret going to see it either.

The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

Yes, this movie is sappy. Yes, it’s rather silly. Yes, it’s a sequel that was clearly made for the sole purpose of milking more money out of a surprise hit. And yet, I’ll be the first person to say that I enjoyed The Second Exotic Marigold Hotel. It’s well acted, it’s charming, and it’s completely harmless. And unlike some other films that try to fall into that last category, it doesn’t insult its audience’s intelligence. The movie does deal with some more mature issues, albeit in a rather simplistic way. But, none of this probably makes sense to you all, so I’ll do my best to elaborate.

For those of you who are uninitiated, this film, The Second Exotic Marigold Hotel, is a sequel to the 2012 British comedy, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, which told the story of a group of retirees deciding to spend their twilight years in a home for the elderly in Jaipur, India. The plot was simple, yet sweet. The characters were one note, but, nevertheless, quirky and memorable. And on top of that, all of the leads–Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Dev Patel–played well off of one another. So, despite having very little advertising, the film ended up becoming a big hit, raking in over $130 million at the box office, more than ten times its budget. As a result, the studios decided to make a sequel, featuring the same characters, the same setting, and all but one of the same cast. And, surprisingly, the sequel isn’t actually all that bad. True, it’s no masterpiece, but neither was the first one. It’s just a sweet, quirky story about sweet, quirky people.

Probably the greatest factor in ensuring that this film isn’t a failure is the fact that it’s not just a retread of the first movie. It is actually advancing the story in some way. See, whereas the original movie primarily focused on establishing who the characters were, why they were in India, and their reactions to their new surroundings, this latest installment in the Merigold franchise deals with their lives now that they’ve become settled. And, well, beyond that, I can’t really say anything else. It’s an ensemble piece with a lot of characters, all of whom have their own personal arcs. So, as you might imagine, the film’s plot does get fairly convoluted at some points. But don’t worry, everything works out in the end.

The second thing this film has going for it is the fact that the performances are all very strong. Everyone seems to care about their character, and everyone seems to be enjoying themselves. One thing you tend to see in a lot of sequels to popular movie franchises–and that you don’t see here–is the actors becoming apathetic. With the Blade and X-men film series, for instance, by the third installments, you can tell that Wesley Snipes and Hugh Jackman are just there to pick up checks. Not in this movie. Everyone here is passionate. Everyone does a terrific job.

And that, I think, is partially what pulls this cash grab sequel up to a 6.5 out of 10. By no means perfect, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is a light-hearted, well acted film that is bound to make you chuckle, and distract you from the darker aspects of your life for a while. Don’t hesitate to give it a look.