Murder On The Orient Express (2017)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

It’s 1934, and Hercule Poirot is the greatest detective in the world. No detail escapes his eye, and he’s almost compulsively devoted to justice. As you can imagine, both of these things make him a sought-after commodity. So much so that he barely has any time for himself. But not anymore. He’s just solved a major case in Jerusalem, and he’s setting off from Istabmul for some much-needed R and R. But, what’s this? One of the train’s passengers has been murdered, and no one knows who did it? Well, it looks like that R and R will have to wait, because there’s a mystery that needs solving, and there’s only one man to solve it.

I’ve been a fan of Kenneth Branagh for years; ever since I saw him as Professor Lockhart in Harry Potter and the Chamber Of Secrets. Then, when I got older, and I watched his directorial efforts, particularly his Shakespeare adaptations, my respect for him grew ten-fold. So when I heard that he was directing a period-mystery-thriller, I knew I’d have to give it a look. And, last night, I did just that. How was it, you ask? Well…

On the positive side, the movie looks amazing. And I don’t just mean the costumes and sets. The cinematography in this film is gorgeous. There are so many beautiful tracking shots, wherein the camera just glides down the train, pausing every once in a while to linger on a particular person or thing, that it makes you want to drool. And the acting, as you expect from a Branagh-helmed film, is superb. Everyone, even people who are only in a few scenes, does a terrific job. And that’s because every single character is played by a world-class actor. And lastly, and most importantly, the film is never boring. The pace is quick, and there are more than enough twists to keep you invested. So, if you’re just looking to watch a well-made mystery, you won’t be disappointed. This film definitely delivers on that front.

That said, I left the theater feeling somewhat let down. Not because of any technical shortcomings, mind you. The story just felt, for lack of a better word, silly. When you learn what’s actually going on, and how stupidly and conveniently connected everything is, you find yourself rolling your eyes. What? This person was actually faking his accent, because he’s really banging this person, who’s actually the ill-legitimate daughter of that person? That’s the kind of silly, overly convoluted nonsense this picture throws at you. If you’ve ever seen Clue, or, better yet, Murder By Death, which directly parodies Hercule Poirot, you know the kind of exaggerated, one-note characters that exist in this film. But unlike those movies, which are comedies, this film plays all the silliness straight, and, in so doing, kind of shoots itself in the foot. Yes, this movie is based off of a book written in the 1930s. But, the thing is, we don’t live in the 1930s. I think that perhaps they should have updated the story a bit; maybe omitted a few of the sillier twists.

Still, I’d be lying if I told you that this was a bad film, or that I wasn’t consistently engaged by it. So, for that reason, I would recommend you all go see it. I put it in the same category as films like The Foreigner; good premise, good production values, but less than stellar execution. Make of this what you will.

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The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

Yes, this movie is sappy. Yes, it’s rather silly. Yes, it’s a sequel that was clearly made for the sole purpose of milking more money out of a surprise hit. And yet, I’ll be the first person to say that I enjoyed The Second Exotic Marigold Hotel. It’s well acted, it’s charming, and it’s completely harmless. And unlike some other films that try to fall into that last category, it doesn’t insult its audience’s intelligence. The movie does deal with some more mature issues, albeit in a rather simplistic way. But, none of this probably makes sense to you all, so I’ll do my best to elaborate.

For those of you who are uninitiated, this film, The Second Exotic Marigold Hotel, is a sequel to the 2012 British comedy, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, which told the story of a group of retirees deciding to spend their twilight years in a home for the elderly in Jaipur, India. The plot was simple, yet sweet. The characters were one note, but, nevertheless, quirky and memorable. And on top of that, all of the leads–Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Dev Patel–played well off of one another. So, despite having very little advertising, the film ended up becoming a big hit, raking in over $130 million at the box office, more than ten times its budget. As a result, the studios decided to make a sequel, featuring the same characters, the same setting, and all but one of the same cast. And, surprisingly, the sequel isn’t actually all that bad. True, it’s no masterpiece, but neither was the first one. It’s just a sweet, quirky story about sweet, quirky people.

Probably the greatest factor in ensuring that this film isn’t a failure is the fact that it’s not just a retread of the first movie. It is actually advancing the story in some way. See, whereas the original movie primarily focused on establishing who the characters were, why they were in India, and their reactions to their new surroundings, this latest installment in the Merigold franchise deals with their lives now that they’ve become settled. And, well, beyond that, I can’t really say anything else. It’s an ensemble piece with a lot of characters, all of whom have their own personal arcs. So, as you might imagine, the film’s plot does get fairly convoluted at some points. But don’t worry, everything works out in the end.

The second thing this film has going for it is the fact that the performances are all very strong. Everyone seems to care about their character, and everyone seems to be enjoying themselves. One thing you tend to see in a lot of sequels to popular movie franchises–and that you don’t see here–is the actors becoming apathetic. With the Blade and X-men film series, for instance, by the third installments, you can tell that Wesley Snipes and Hugh Jackman are just there to pick up checks. Not in this movie. Everyone here is passionate. Everyone does a terrific job.

And that, I think, is partially what pulls this cash grab sequel up to a 6.5 out of 10. By no means perfect, The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is a light-hearted, well acted film that is bound to make you chuckle, and distract you from the darker aspects of your life for a while. Don’t hesitate to give it a look.