Who Gets A Chance In Hollywood?

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Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

Li Mu Bai has long led a warrior’s life. But now, after years of bloodshed, he’s determined to turn over a new leaf. So, to prove to everyone that he’s done killing, he gives his sword, the legendary Green Destiny, to Yu Shu Lien, a fellow warrior, and unrequited love interest. But when the Green Destiny is stolen, and Yu and Li’s investigation brings them to the home of a government official, they realize that there’s more to this story than meets the eye.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is a movie I have loved literally my entire life. Not only was it the first film I ever saw, but it was also the movie that made me want to make movies. Seriously. As soon as I watched this back in 2000, I got a camera, and made my own kung fu movie, Crouching Lion, Hidden Eagle. Any picture that can get a six year old who doesn’t even know what a camera is to want to make movies is doing something right. And I’m not the only one who thinks that. To date, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon remains the highest grossing foreign-language film in American history, as well as the most critically-acclaimed martial arts movie of all time; with a record four Academy Awards to its name, and ten nominations, including Best Picture. But why was it so beloved? Why do people still remember it after so many years? What, to put it bluntly, makes this movie so good?

Well, several things, actually. The first is it’s script. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is a very well-written movie, with it actually getting nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay, and for good reason. Every single character is given depth, personality, and pain. The film is almost three hours long, and it contains many quiet scenes where characters just sit and talk to each other about their dreams and desires. As such, the protagonists of this film are considerably more well-rounded than those in other martial arts movies. The second thing that makes this movie awesome is the camerawork. Crouching Tiger, Hidden dragon is beautifully shot, with every single frame dripping with life and color. Peter Pau, the cinematographer, won an Oscar for lensing this film, and I can totally see why. Every time I watch it, I feel like I’ve been transported to another world, and it’s all thanks to the images onscreen. The third thing that makes Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon incredible is the acting. Everyone gives a subtle, restrained performance, not at all what you’d expect from a film like this, and, indeed, many members of the cast were nominated for BAFTA and Hong Kong Film Awards for their work. The standout, easily, is Zhang Ziyi, who steals the Green Destiny, and the whole damn show. She is magnetic on screen. She’s bold and fiery, and yet, vulnerable and sweet. By this point in her career, She’d already made somewhat of a name for herself back in China, but it was her work in Crouching Tiger that catapulted her into the stratosphere of stardom, not just in the East, but in the West as well. For the next five years, she was everywhere, appearing in big films like Hero, Rush Hour 2, Memoirs Of A Geisha, and House Of Flying Daggers. It is extremely rare for an Asian actress to become big in Hollywood, but Zhang Ziyi did, and it’s all thanks to her incredible performance in this movie. The fourth, and biggest, reason why Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon is awesome is the action.  It is SUPERB. It’s exciting, well-shot, beautifully-choreographed, and inventive. The fight sequences in this movie hold up after 17 years, and for good reason. They’re real. Every single moment was done in camera, by real stuntmen. And you can tell. In the film’s most famous fight scene, where Michelle Yeoh and Zhang Ziyi duke it out in a courtyard, you hear the actresses panting, and see the sweat dripping down their faces. You really believe that this is a hard, brutal fight, and that it’s taking a serious toll on both their bodies. And whenever a film can convince you that a staged action sequence is real, it’s done something right.

Now, as much as I adore Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and, trust me, I could gush about it for ages, there are some aspects of it that I don’t enjoy as much, all these years later. The biggest, by far, is the flashback sequence, wherein we see Zhang Ziyi’s backstory. Yes, it’s necessary, and it helps you understand her character. But it’s also very long, and very, very slow. It goes on for about 40 minutes, and when you watch it, you just feel like you’re in a different movie. The whole thing really hurts the pace, and I honestly tend to fast-forward through it whenever I re-watch the film. Which brings me to another point, the fact that the movie’s plot is kind of scatter-brained. It starts out as a drama about a warrior trying to abandon his bloody past. Then it becomes a mystery, where they have to find the Green Destiny. Then it turns into a romantic drama, wherein Zhang Ziyi wants to escape her arranged marriage and go live in the desert. And then, in the last 30 minutes, it becomes a kind of road movie, where Zhang Ziyi is just roaming the land, taking what she wants and fighting whomever she pleases. Yes, everyone has an arc, and all the subplots do pay off. But, upon re-watch, it does feel like some of those subplots could have been omitted, and the movie, as a whole, would have become more focused.

But those are really the only negative things I have to say about Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. This is a well-shot, well-acted, emotionally-devastating character piece, with some amazing fight sequences and action. If you somehow haven’t seen this movie after all this time, go out and rent it RIGHT NOW!  You will love it.

Lust, Caution (2007)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is the name, And Views Are My Game.

In 1938, a radical Chinese theater troupe decide to put on their most daring performance; the seduction, and assassination, of a high-ranking Japanese collaborator. The first thing they do is find their leading lady, a naive college student named Wang Chia-Chi. Next, they find their stage, a mansion in Hong Kong where Wang is to catch her prey. And, finally, they introduce her to her main opponent in this great drama, Mr. Yee, the collaborator they intend to kill. The stage is set. The pieces are in place. All that’s necessary is for someone to make the first move. But, just as in an old Greek Tragedy, nothing about their scheme goes according to plan.

Lust, Caution is a movie I’d been wanting to see for years. Not only was it directed by Ang Lee, the man responsible for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon–my favorite film of all time–but the picture’s story also checked all my interest boxes. World War 2 in Asia? Check. Espionage? Check. Stories about artists and creative types saving the world? Check. On paper, it seems like the perfect movie for me. Having finally seen it now, well, I’m a little less starry-eyed. Is this a terrible movie? Not at all. Is it bad? Not in the slightest. But will I ever want to see it again? Absolutely not. Lust, Caution is a film with what I have decided to refer to as, “La La Land Syndrome,” in that it’s a well-shot, well acted movie with high production values that I didn’t enjoy because I didn’t feel invested in the story.

When you watch the film, you can tell that it was made by people with talent. The music, the cinematography, and the costumes and sets are all superb. I’d actually like to take a minute to talk about those last two, because they are absolutely beautiful. Every outfit that Tang Wei, the lead actress, wears in this movie is exquisite, and the props, vehicles and buildings that were used all bring 1930s China to life. And the acting, as you might expect from an Ang Lee movie, is top notch, with the one possible exception being Wang Leehom, whom plays the leader of the main theater troupe, and whose American accent while speaking Mandarin was noticeable even to me. But, really, that’s a minor detail. Technically, this film is perfect.

It’s just that, when it comes to story, the movie isn’t nearly at the same level. The film is about three hours long, and I swear I’m not making this up, it’s not until we’re an hour and a half in that anything interesting happens. For the first 90 minutes, we’re forced to endure an endless series of Mahjong games, drawing room conversations, and walks through the park. And virtually none of what gets said in these conversations comes into play later on, so they just come off as pointless padding. I understand the slow pacing and extra dialogue were added to flesh out the characters–the film is based on a forty page short story where not much background is given–but they’re just a slog to get through. There were several points in this movie where I seriously considered stopping. I didn’t feel invested in the characters, and the story was taking too long. Now, before any of you accuse me of being a brain dead millennial with the attention span of a squirrel, just know that some of my favorite films of all time–Gandhi, Lawrence Of Arabia, Dances With Wolves–are well over the three hour mark. It’s not the length of the movie that bothers me. It’s the slow pacing, and the fact that nothing of substance happens until we’re more than half way through it that get me. This script was in serious need of a trim.

Something else that I wanted to touch on in this review are the sex scenes. When Lust, Caution was released back in 2007, it was banned in several countries, and given an NC-17 rating in the US because of its “graphic content.” Now, hearing that, you probably think that this film is overflowing with sex–that there’s hardly a frame where breasts or genitals aren’t on display. Not so. I counted, and it’s not until the two hour mark, on the dot, that we get any kind of sex or nudity. And, the truth is, you don’t actually see anything when Wang and Mr. Yee are doing the deed. All that’s visible are breasts, and you can see those in any R-rated movie. Can someone please explain to me why this film, and not any of the other raunchy comedies out there, deserved to get an NC-17 rating? Now, it’s possible that the version of Lust, Caution I saw was edited, and that the original cut featured far more graphic stuff, but that still doesn’t change the fact that for a movie that advertises itself as an erotic thriller, nothing remotely erotic happens until two thirds of the way through. And the sex itself isn’t even that interesting. It’s all done in one, long, static wide shot, the lighting is low, and the whole thing kind of comes off as cold and unfeeling. If you’re looking for titilation, you won’t find it here.

As I said before, this movie is beautifully crafted, well-acted, and the premise is very interesting. For those reasons, I feel like I should recommend it to you. At the same time, however, I’d be remiss if I failed to point out that the movie is very long, very slow, and that the sex scenes which its famous for don’t come until about two hours in, and that they aren’t even that interesting. Make of that what you will.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu is The Name, ANd Views Are My Game.

How often do you come across people who say “I want to be wrong?” Not very, I’ll bet. And yet, that was exactly what I kept saying to myself as soon as I heard that Netflix and The Weinstein Company were making a sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. See, I might not have mentioned it here before but, Crouching Tiger , Hidden Dragon is my favorite film of all time. It’s not only the first movie I ever saw, but it’s also the movie that inspired me to want to make films. Seriously! As soon as I saw it, I went out and made a short movie “Crouching Lion, Hidden Eagle” with my parent’s cam quarter. And, keep in mind, I was only six at the time I did this. Any movie that can inspire a six year old to want to go out and make movies, when he doesn’t even know what a camera is yet, is fucking amazing! And I’m not the only one who feels this way. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was a huge critical and commercial success at the time of its release, taking home four Academy Awards, and, to this day, remains the highest grossing foreign language film in American history. Everything about it, from its direction, to its screenplay, to its cinematography and its score, were lauded. This was the film that made an international superstar out of Chinese actress Zhang Ziyi, who went on to star in such acclaimed movies as Hero, House Of Flying Daggers, 2046, and Memoirs Of A Geisha. This was the picture that cemented director Ang Lee’s status as one of the all-time great filmmakers, and proved to Hollywood executives that, yes, non-English movies can make money, and are, in fact, worth producing.

This sequel, however–this sickening piece of filth that dares to carry the same name as the original, beloved masterpiece–is nothing but garbage. It is the total antithesis of everything the first film was, or stood for. Just to give you an idea of what we’re dealing with here, the original film was over three hours long, shot entirely in Mandarin, and was primarily a drama, but with fight scenes scattered throughout. The sequel, by contrast, is barely over an hour and a half long, shot entirely in English, and is just a series of fight sequences strung together by the loosest of plots. The original Crouching Tiger took its time before jumping into the action, with the first 20 minutes being devoted to character development and dialogue. The sequel barely waits 2 minutes before shoving us into one of many pointless, poorly shot, poorly edited fight scenes. The first film was done entirely in-camera, with actual people performing the stunts and choreography. The sequel has A LOT of CGI in it, and, half the time when you’re watching the movie, you can tell that those aren’t real people, backgrounds, or objects. I could go on forever, but I think you get the idea.

Now, to be fair, this sequel was doomed from the start. The original Crouching Tiger ended with all but one of the main characters dying. This, by itself, makes it very difficult for anyone to make a sequel without there being a huge shift in tone and style. Add to this the fact that the studios waited over 15 years to make the sequel, and you’ve got a project just begging to fail. Now, by itself, a delayed production and drastic shift in tone aren’t enough to doom a film. Aliens came out in 1986, a whole seven years after the release of Alien, and was an action film as opposed to a horror movie, and yet, it turned out to be great. But in that circumstance, you had a really talented group of filmmakers–James Cameron, Walter Hill–working behind the camera to make the movie the best that it could be. The sequel to Crouching Tiger, by contrast, lacks any such talented individuals on its crew. Just to give you an idea, the film’s director, Yuen Woo-Ping, isn’t even a director. He’s a fight choreographer. He gave us all the combat in The Matrix, Kill Bill, and the original Crouching Tiger, so we know that he’s good at getting people to punch, kick and strangle each other in an entertaining manner. But can he tell a good story? Can he create characters who are well-rounded, and that you want to see prevail? No, and no. Ang lee, the man behind the original Crouching Tiger, has one two Academy Awards for Best Director. He knows how to get good performances out of actors, and to build up worlds with subtlety and nuance. Yuen Woo-Ping is about as subtle as a bat to the head. Add to this the fact that the sequel was written by John Fusco–who penned such films as Thunderheart, The Forbidden Kingdom, and Spirit: Mustang Of The Cimarron–and you’ve got everything you need to know.

Guys, I’m going to make this very simple by stating that the sequel to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is absolute garbage. I award it a 0 out of 10! That’s right. I hate it more than Inglorious Bastards, the remake of Point Break, and 50 Shades Of Grey combined. DON’T WATCH IT!

List Of Awesome Asian-American Films

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, ANd Views Are My Game.

If you follow my blog, then you know that the inclusion and representation of Asians in mainstream media is something that’s very important to me. I’ve written at great length here about the limited roles that are available for Asian actors, and discussed the stereotypes that exist, and are still spread about us, in the West. But what I might not have mentioned is that, for all the bad that’s out there with regards to representation, there is also some good. There are films out there, made by Asians and non-Asian alike, that show us as nuanced, well-rounded individuals, and that tell our stories with respect and care. A few of them have even become critically and financially successful, and today, I’d like to share them with you all. Now, keep in mind, this list is entirely opinion based, and the films I discuss here are not being ordered from best to worst, or vice versa. Some are comedies. Some are dramas. Some are new. Some are old. Whatever their genre or time period, what’s consistent about each of them is that they tell the Asian American story with the level of respect and complexity that it deserves, and I truly believe that you all would enjoy yourselves if you gave them a look. With that said, let’s dive right in to my top 10 list of Awesome Asian-American films!

1. Advantageous, by Jennifer Phang:

A story of sacrifice, love, and the bond between mothers and daughters, this 2014 sci-fi drama is set in the near future, where human beings have developed the technology to implant their consciences into new bodies. The protagonist, Gwen Ko, is the chief spokesperson for a cosmetics company. Due to the fact that she’s now in her 40s, the company decides that she’s too old to be their face, even though she’s better at the job than any other candidate. Gwen tries to find work elsewhere, but quickly discovers that this is a future where women are expected to stay in the house. So, to maintain her affluent lifestyle, and pay for her daughter’s expensive private school, Gwen decides to undergo a procedure in which her conscience will be transferred into a younger body. In this way, she’ll be able to keep acting as the chief spokesperson for the company, and her daughter will be able to get a good education, and thus be able to avoid being abused by men. But not all is what it seems to be, as Gwen quickly discovers that she risks losing a whole lot more than her face by undergoing this procedure. Advantageous is smart, touching, and highly relevant in this day and age, where so much emphasis is placed on youth and beauty. It’s also a unique film to watch, because it’s one of the few sci-fi pictures directed by an Asian person. (Nearly all the movies made about, or by, Asian people, are dramas set in the real world, so a genre piece of this nature is highly unusual). The bottom line is, Advantageous is a great, thought-provoking piece, and you all shouldn’t hesitate to give it a look.

2. White Frog, by Quentin Lee:

Nick Young is a 15-year-old Chinese-American boy with Aspergers who’s spent his whole life living in his older brother, Chaz’s, shadow. When Chaz is tragically killed by a reckless driver, however, Nick ends up discovering a number of shocking things about him, not least of which was the fact that he was secretly gay. As the story progresses, and Nick, his parents, and Chaz’s friends and lovers go through their various stages of grief, they find themselves growing closer, and learning the true meanings of love, family, and acceptance, emerging stronger and happier at the end than they were before. On the one hand, this film could easily be written off as sentimental, politically-correct propaganda. The fact that the film is not only focusing on a Chinese-American family–something you rarely see in mainstream movies–but on disability and homosexuality as well, might make it sound like the filmmakers are simply trying to not offend anybody by including as many minorities as possible. But when you actually sit down and watch the picture, see the heart and care that Quentin Lee is putting into every frame, it becomes hard not to enjoy it. None of the characters seem like tokens or cut outs. They feel like people. And with veteran actors like Law & Order SVU‘s BD Wong and The Last Emperor‘s Joan Chen lending credibility to the picture, you know it can’t all be bad.

3. Man From Reno, by Dave Boyle:

The film begins on a cold, fog-shrouded night in a town just south of San Francisco. Sheriff Paul Del Moral is making his usual rounds when, out of nowhere, an unknown man smashes into his windshield. Startled, the Sheriff brings the stranger, an unidentified Japanese man in his 20s, to the hospital, and tries to find out who he is and where he came from. We then cut to Tokyo, where successful crime-writer Aki Akahori is on tour to promote her new, and final, book. Dissatisfied with the whole affair, and suffering from depression after the death of her lover Kenji, Aki decides to run off to San Francisco to visit some friends. While there, she encounters a debonair stranger named Akira, who claims to be from Reno. The two talk, and seem to be forming a connection, when, out of nowhere, Akira vanishes. And as if this weren’t confusing enough, Sheriff DelMoral’s mystery man in the hospital disappears as well. Confused, and eager to understand just what the hell happened, the two parties begin investigating the matters, eventually crossing paths and joining forces. With its slow pacing, rich atmosphere, and ambient soundtrack, Man From Reno is a modern masterpiece of noir. But beyond its style and enthralling mystery, the film also possesses a surprising amount of dramatic heft. Ayako Fujitani, whom plays Aki, manages to bring a great deal of depth and range to the character–going from tough and cynical, to depressed and lonely, to witty and cheerful, and all while remaining very subtle with her expressions and inflections. One of the most powerful scenes in the entire movie is one that doesn’t have any dialogue at all. It takes place shortly after she arrives in San Francisco, and involves her lying in the bathtub, staring at a razor blade. She doesn’t look overly sad or angry in it–just curious. Like “What would it feel like if I slit my wrists with this blade?” The fact that she doesn’t mug, that she doesn’t try to really over sell the fact that her character is depressed and considering suicide, and plays it more like she’s become so numb that nothing really bothers her, is both terrifying and brilliant. We don’t know what she’s thinking in that scene, and that makes it all the more tension filled. But with regards to representation, the film is also great. All the Asian characters feel fleshed out and well-rounded, and this is especially satisfying to watch when you consider the fact that the film’s director/screenwriter is White. Then again, the director/writer in question, Dave Boyle, tends to make films with largely Asian casts, so I guess it’s not too surprising. But, back to my original point; Man From Reno is a stylish, well-acted, well-shot mystery with great characters, and I know that you all would enjoy it if you gave it a look.

4. The Motel, directed by Michael Kang:

Thirteen-year-old Ernest Chin’s life is devoted to working at his family’s hourly-rate motel, where a steady stream of prostitutes, johns, and various other shady characters come and go. Abandoned by his father, he lives with his mother, grandfather, and younger sister Katie. The film is a loosely assembled series of vignettes examining the difficulty of adolescence. Recurring themes include painful encounters with a bully named Roy and Ernest’s persistent feelings of being misunderstood by his family. Ernest also blindly explores his incipient sexuality, which includes nursing a crush on Christine, an older girl who works at a Chinese restaurant nearby. Ernest’s life changes after he meets the newest guest at the motel: a self-destructive yet charming KoreanAmerican man named Sam Kim, who is caught in a downward spiral after estrangement from his wife. This film is quirky, memorable, and deeply heartfelt. It’s one of the best character studies I’ve ever seen. And unlike some other indie films–cough, cough, Juno, cough, cough–which try to set themselves apart from mainstream movies by being overly ironic and hip, this film stays highly grounded. All I can say is that if you want to laugh, cry, and watch some really good acting, give this movie a look.

5. Better Luck Tomorrow, directed by Justin Lin:

Loosely inspired by the real-life murder of Oakland County teen Stuart Tay, this sleek, high intensity crime drama tells the story of four over-achieving Asian-American High School students, who turn to a life of petty crime and drug use just to feel alive again. This film is awesome, and for many different reasons. Firstly, it’s well-acted, and well-shot. Secondly, it boasts an all-star cast–including Sung Kang from the Fast & Furious franchise, and John Cho from the Star Trek and Harold & Kumar movies. Thirdly, it is helmed by Justin Lin, whom directed four of the seven Fast & Furious movies. And finally, and this is what’s most important to me, it doesn’t emasculate its male, Asian characters. So often when you watch movies or TV shows these days, Asian men are portrayed as wimpy, nerdy side-kicks. Raj in The Big Bang Theory, Hiro in Heroes–the list goes on. Asian men are never shown as strong, confident, or sexually appealing. I cannot think of a single, successful, mainstream movie or TV series in which an Asian man was the romantic lead. This film goes the exact opposite route. The guys in this film are, well, guys. They drink, swear, talk about girls, do drugs, and so on. They’re shown as regular people, and that, just by itself, is extraordinary. Why don’t we have more movies like this? It’s not like it bombed at the box office, or was panned by critics. Quite the opposite, actually. It made more than 12 times its $250,000 budget in ticket sales, and most critics, like Roger Ebert, loved it. All I can say is that if you want to watch an exciting, well-acted, well-shot movie that dares to show Asian men as men, don’t hesitate to give this movie a look.

6. Saving Face, directed by Alice Wu:

It’s a sad fact, but homosexuality is something that is often not discussed, or embraced, in the Chinese-American community. There are, of course, exceptions to this rule–when my Aunt came out to my Grandfather, he welcomed her with open arms–but, for the most part, gay and lesbian relationships are not explored in Asian-American cinema or literature. Saving Face, a 2004 romantic comedy about a young Chinese-American surgeon struggling to balance the needs of her pregnant, unwed mother, and her dancer girlfriend, is one of the few Asian films to do so. And my god is it glorious! The humor is great, the acting is superb, and the directing is astounding, especially when you consider that this film was helmed by a first-time director. Each scene is shot and choreographed with the utmost thought and care. Every single frame drips with raw, pure emotion. And lest you think I exaggerate, the stars of this film–Michelle Krusiec, Lynn Chen, and Joan Chen–have all publicly stated that they found the process of making this movie to be one of the most enjoyable and intimate experiences of their professional careers. And, well, you can’t argue with that, now can you? The bottom line is, Saving Face is definitely worth watching. Do so!

7. Chan Is Missing, directed by Wayne Wang:

This is the original Asian-American film. What I mean by that is, it is the first picture portraying us as complex, multi-faceted individuals to gain critical and commercial success outside the community, and to generate a demand for more works from Asian-American artists. And lest you think I exaggerate with that statement, in 1995, Chan is Missing was inducted into the Library of Congress’s National Film Registry as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” It tells the story of two San Francisco Chinatown taxi drivers, Jo and Steve, trying to find a man named Chan who owes them some money. As they interview various locals about the missing man, they get a fractured, even contradictory portrait of him, mirroring the complexities of the polyglot Chinese-American community he allegorizes. Shot in black and white, and containing elements of the film noir genre, the movie manages to combine a surprising amount of heart with humor. And what makes it even better is that, while it does seek to educate its non-Asian viewers about the real lives of Chinese-Americans, it doesn’t try to tell them that we’re all alike, even in goodness. A great deal of the film contains imagery of faces being blotted, or washed out, so that you can’t actually see them, letting us know that it’s never all right to generalize, even if it is in a positive manner. All of us are individuals, and all of us should be regarded as such. Just because we have the same skin color, or ethnic background, doesn’t mean we like the same things, think the same way, or behave in the same manner. We don’t even necessarily want to be treated the same way, and the film touches upon that as well. The final shot is of a photograph of the missing Chan, with Jo’s voice-over stating, “Here’s a picture of Chan Hung, and I still can’t see him,” implying that our community is ever growing, changing and evolving, and that we don’t even know who we are or who we’re becoming some times. So, if you want to see a culturally, historically, and aesthetically unique work that is both humorous and heartfelt, put this film at the top of your Netflix queue.

8. Mississippi Masala, directed by Mira Nair:

The story of one family’s quest to find a place where they belong, Mississippi Masala begins with Ugandan dictator Idi Amin expelling all Asians from his country. One of the newly stateless thousands is a man named Jay, who decides to start a new life in America. He moves his family to rural Mississippi, and there, his wife opens a liquor store, he aimlessly sues the Ugandan government for his property, and his daughter begins an illicit romance with a local man (Denzel Washington). Needless to say, a great deal of hijinks ensue in this smart, sexy, and highly touching comedy-drama. Though its marketed as a love story, at its heart, Mississippi Masala is an exploration of identity and societal alienation. All this can be found in the character of Jay. Jay was born in Uganda, and therefore identifies first and foremost as an African. The Ugandan government, however, tells him that, being ethnically Indian, he can never truly be an African. Then, when he and his family moved to America, he tries to become American. But, once again, society tells him that, because he has the wrong skin color, he can never truly be a member of it. There’s something deeply tragic, and deeply relatable, about his plight. It’s one that many, if not all immigrants, face–not knowing where you belong. My grandfather, for instance, came to America from China in 1949, and faced a great deal of discrimination. People wouldn’t hire him. They wouldn’t serve him. They constantly reminded him that, because he wasn’t White and because he spoke with an accent, he would never truly be an American. And then, when he went back to China to visit after 20 years, people treated him like an outsider, mocking his odd American customs, and his old-fashioned manner of speaking. As I watched Jay go through all this in the film, I couldn’t help but tear up a bit, because I saw so much of my grandfather in him. That’s how you know that this is a great movie, the fact that it can effect its audience members on such a personal level. So, to sum it all up, Mississippi Masala is funny, touching, daring, and deeply relatable. And who wouldn’t want a movie to be all those things?

9. The Joy Luck Club, directed by Wayne Wang:

If Chan Is Missing was the first Asian-American film, The Joy Luck Club was the first Asian-American film to become a huge hit. Seriously. This movie, and the novel that it was based off of, made tons of money, and more or less created the standard for what other Asian-American works of art should be like. And while I don’t think either the book or the film is a perfect representation of our community, I have to admire them for what they are, a movie and a novel made by, and about, Asian people that non-Asian audiences flocked to see. That’s pretty rare, even nowadays. But, concerning plot, Four older women, all Chinese immigrants living in San Francisco, meet regularly to play mahjong, eat, and tell stories. Each of these women has an adult Chinese-American daughter. The film reveals the hidden pasts of the older women and their daughters and how their lives are shaped by the clash of Chinese and American cultures as they strive to understand their family bonds and one another. The film is well-acted, the stories are heart-wrenching, and it’s kind of cool to see a movie with an all-star Asian-American cast. Seriously! Almost everyone in this film has gone on to do other stuff. There’s Ming Na Wen, who went on to star in Mulan, ER, and Agents Of Shield. There’s Lauren Tom, who became known for voice acting in Futurama, King Of The Hill, and Codename: Kids Next Door. There’s Tamilyn Tomida, whom you all might recognize from The Karate Kid: Part 2, and The Day After Tomorrow. Even the women playing the mothers have had successful careers. Tsai Chin, for instance, whom portrays Tamilyn Tomida’s mother, has been in two Bond films, 1967’s You Only Live Twice, where she was the Bond girl, and 2006’s Casino Royale, where she had a minor role as a poker player. The bottom line is, The Joy Luck Club is a well-acted, well-written work with great actors that is guaranteed to leave you in tears, and in the best possible way.

10. The Wedding Banquet, directed by Ang Lee:

Though he’d earned critical praise with his debut feature, Pushing Hands, legendary director Ang Lee first won over the audiences of America with this hilarious and heartfelt romantic comedy. The story of a gay Taiwanese-American man who marries a mainland Chinese woman to placate his parents and get her a green card, the film mixes a surprising amount of drama with screwball comedy. As with The Joy Luck Club, The Wedding Banquet was one of the first films made by, and about, Asian people that Americans flocked to see. And while it does seem a little bit dated now, it is still a well-crafted, highly-enjoyable film to watch. There are glimpses in it of the greatness that would appear later on in Lee’s career, and as with Saving Face, it is nice to see a film that deals with homosexuality within the Asian-American community. All I can say is that if you want to watch a movie and feel good, give this film a look. It will definitely make you smile.