Baby Driver (2017)

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

Baby is a getaway driver, working off a debt to the mob. A victim of tinnitus, he constantly blasts music in his ears, partly to help focus, and partly to drown out the ringing that’s been there since he was a kid. He’s never given any thought to what he might do after he’s paid his debt, but now, with the end in sight, and a potential love interest in the form of the waitress Deborah, he’s starting to get ideas. Unfortunately for him, his mob boss isn’t done, as he’s determined to have Baby help on their biggest, and most dangerous, heist. Baby is reluctant, as he’s eager to put that part of his life behind him. But when his colleagues threaten Deborah and his stepfather, Joe, he agrees, and finds himself pulled, once more, into the high-speed world of crime.

Baby Driver is stylish, quirky, well acted, and reasonably entertaining. And unlike half the other films coming out this summer, it’s not based on any pre-existing material. For those reasons alone, I think that you all should see it. I’m certain you won’t regret doing so.

That being said, I have no desire to watch it again. Not because I think it’s bad, but because this movie suffers from much of the same problems that plague all of its director, Edgar Wright’s, other films: like an overlong runtime, an unnecessarily bloated climax, and a general lack of emotional impact. The best way for me to describe Edgar Wright’s movies is as pieces of bubble gum. They pop. They’re flavorful. But they aren’t very nutritious. And they lose their taste very quickly. I felt that way about his movie Hot Fuzz, which I reviewed here, and that’s how I feel about Baby Driver. Both are fun. Both are perfectly watchable. But they’re both about 10 minutes longer than they should be, with their climaxes being unnecessarily bloated, and neither one left me feeling any wiser or more mature. They are pure escapist fantasy, with the fantasy aspect being very prevalent in Baby Driver. The romance between Baby and Deborah is so unrealistically cutesy, that of took me out of the picture. Most films show characters falling in love over time, with them either bonding over mutual interests, or circumstances forcing them together. You don’t get either of those here. Debora falls in love with Baby straight off the bat, without him even saying that much. He just comes into the diner where she works, and she’s instantly smitten with him. He barely says a word in their conversation. And yet , without even knowing his real name, she is willing to do incredibly dangerous, and illegal, things with him… because. This is not the sort of thing people do in real life. Yes, the world of the film is heightened, but I still couldn’t believe their relationship. And because that is the emotional heart of the picture, I was honestly left kind of bored in parts.

Guys, all I can say is this. Baby Driver is stylish, competently crafted, and original enough to keep you entertained if you watch it. I’m certain you won’t regret going to see it if you do. But if you want to watch a Heist-adventure film with a bit more depth and pathos, watch Okja, which is streaming on Netflix. It actually has a point of view, and it did hit me with the feels when it was done.

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