Hush

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

Imagine you’re out in the woods, miles away from any kind of help. Someone’s nearby, and that someone means to kill you. Now imagine that this killer, this boogieman in the dark, can’t be heard. Because you can’t hear. And the killer knows this. And he’s gonna use this to his advantage. If you can picture all this, then you’ll have a good idea of what to expect with Hush, the subject of today’s review.

A contained thriller set in an isolated cabin, Hush follows Maddie, a deaf author, as she gets stalked and taunted by a killer who likes to play with his food before he eats it. While hardly boasting an original premise, the film does move at a brisk pace, and offers up some very effective scares. I’ve always said I’ll take a well-crafted thriller over an “artistic,” “award-winning” movie any day, and this film is precisely the kind of thriller I’m talking about when I say that. The acting is good, the characters are given just the right amount of backstory for you to care about them, the cinematography is appropriately creepy, and the sound design is superb. This film doesn’t try to be anything but suspenseful and entertaining, and, by god, it manages to be both in every scene. The opening shot alone, which is accompanied by this loud boom, instantly sets you on edge, and keeps you weary for the rest of the picture. The film also does a really good job of visually conveying information to the audience. For instance, we learn that Maddie is deaf, not through someone telling us that she is, but by watching her cook. We hear her chopping vegetables, boiling water, and so on. But then the camera pans over to her ear, and, suddenly, there’s no more chopping, boiling, hissing or sizzling to be heard. It’s a clever and effective way to get out necessary information without needing a huge exposition dump.

I was also pretty impressed with the way the filmmakers represented this disabled character. So often in movies, people like me are shown as weak, childlike, or helpless. Usually, we’re just portrayed as pitiful objects you should feel sorry for. Here, though, Maddie is shown as being intelligent, self-sufficient, funny and social. Her disability doesn’t prevent her from living by herself, and that’s great, because its true. Most, if not all, disabled people are capable of living on their own. I just wish the movies would show that every once in a while. The only thing I would say about the representation of deafness in this film is that the actress playing Maddie never makes a sound. She keeps her mouth shut the entire movie, and signs everything. The truth is, that’s not really how it works. Most of my deaf friends do make noise when they sign, it just doesn’t sound like words. The reason is, they still have vocal chords, and even if they can’t hear the noises their making, they’re still capable of making them. And they do. They cry if they get hurt, they laugh if they think something’s funny, and so on. These are just natural human reactions to things, and people make them, whether they can hear them or not. Think of it this way, I can’t see my own facial expressions because I have poor eyesight, but I still know how to smile and frown, because those are just things that human beings instinctively do. This isn’t so much a criticism of the filmmakers, because, like I said, they did a good job of making this deaf character sympathetic and self-sufficient, it’s just something misleading I wanted to point out.

So, in conclusion, Hush is a well-paced, well acted, well-shot thriller, with some good scares, and good representation. If you want to be engaged and entertained for about 80 minutes, give this film a look.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s