The Wailing

Greetings Loved Ones! Liu Is The Name, And Views Are My Game.

2016 was, if nothing else, a magnificent year for Korean cinema. Train To Busan, The Handmaiden, Age Of Shadows, these were FANTASTIC thrillers that made HUGE splashes on the festival circuit, and drew attention to an area of the world often overlooked. The subject of today’s review, The Wailing, was another popular Korean export, with many critics placing it on their top 10 lists, and it currently holding a 99% approval rating at Rotten Tomatoes. Now, if you know me, you know that I don’t place much stock in critical reviews, or Rotten Tomatoes, since I think giving a film a numerical score creates a majority opinion, and prevents people from making their own decisions, and what critics like and audience’s enjoy don’t often overlap. In this case, however, I decided to give the critics the benefit of the doubt, and The Wailing a look, and holy crap!

The story of a small town detective trying to solve the mystery surrounding a series of bizarre deaths, all of which seem connected to this weird Japanese hermit, the film mixes a lot of different genres and tones. At once a mystery, police procedural, supernatural horror film, and comedy, the picture shifts from silly to gruesome on an almost scene to scene basis. In one moment, the protagonist’s daughter will catch him and his wife banging in their car, and in another, a deranged man in a hospital will be shown disemboweling himself. It’s an odd dichotomy, to be sure. There’s also a lot of inconsistency with the characterization here. What I mean by that is, in one scene, the protagonist will be shown as doubting there’s any supernatural cause for the deaths, then, in the next scene, he’ll be more than happy to let a clearly crazy woman walk through an active crime scene and tell him stories about satanic rituals, and then, immediately afterwards, he’ll be acting all skeptical again. It’s weird, to say the least. And yet, for all the inconsistency with characterization and tone, for all the idiotic choices the protagonist makes, for all the blending of genres and motifs, I was consistently riveted by The Wailing, and would honestly recommend it to you all.

This is one of those rare films that breaks so many rules, and shifts its genre and tone so many times, that it actually kind of works. And when I say that, I’m not trying to paint this as a “so bad it’s good” type picture. The gorgeous cinematography, stellar acting, and eerie, atmospheric lighting make it clear that this film was made by people with talent. No, what I mean when I say that is, this film plays with various genre conventions–it knows that the audience is expecting certain things when they see this type of movie–and it inverts them. It gives you something new, something unexpected. The writer/director, Na Hong-Jin, stated in an interview with The Playlist that he believes there are three types of audience members, those who make random guesses, those who absorb the plot, and those who just can’t catch up. This film, he explained, was meant to appeal to all three groups, and by god, it does.

So if you’re looking for something unique, something out of the ordinary and interesting, give The Wailing a look. It won’t disappoint.

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