Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice

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And, I’m just going to go ahead and say it, I really enjoyed this movie. I think it’s exciting, well-acted, and well-shot. On top of that, if you’re a fan of comic books, or the Justice League animated series, you’re going to have the biggest orgasm ever at the sight of the holy trinity–Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman–finally teaming up on the big screen. I’m really hoping that, despite all the negative reviews this movie has gotten, it’ll make enough money for Warner Brothers to Green Light the rest of the movies in the DC Cinematic Universe. I want there to be a Wonder Woman movie. I want there to be a Flash movie. I want to see the Justice League make their cinematic debut. And, if the jam-packed theater I was sitting in tonight indicates anything, it’s that, all of those dreams just might come true.

Now, with all that said, I’ll be the first to admit that this movie has problems. Most of them are story-related. Others have to do with certain choices the filmmakers made with regards to representing these characters. But, if you ask me, the biggest problem with Batman V Superman is that it doesn’t seem certain of what kind of movie it wants to be. Sometimes it comes off as a very mature, very thoughtful political thriller, just with superheroes in it. Other times, it feels like a great big sci-fi spectacle, full of explosions and wanton property damage. And then, at other points, it seems like you’re watching an artsy indie film directed by Terrence Mallick, or Hou Hsiao-Hsien. A fine example of this latter phenomenon is the first five minutes of the movie. In them, we’re given Batman’s origins. We see the Waynes getting murdered, and young Bruce running away from their funeral, only to fall into a cave full of bats. On top of lasting way too long (thank you, slow motion), and looking far too much like the first five minutes of Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins, this scene is accompanied by some very melodramatic, very nonsensical sounding narration. The first line Bruce Wayne speaks in this film is something like, “There was a time before: a time above.” The hell does that mean? What does that have to do with, well, anything? I certainly don’t know, and I don’t think the filmmakers do either, because this whole opening narration never gets touched upon again.

Also, like its predecessor, Man Of Steel, this movie doesn’t seem to realize that what made these characters interesting was their moral code. Why would someone who could, very easily, conquer the whole Earth, choose not to? Why would he refrain from using his powers to bully others? Why would a man who witnessed his parents get murdered right in front of him, and who constantly gets tortured by sadistic serial killer clowns, not become a madman himself? Because they knew that that was the right thing to do, and that that fact alone was enough of a reason. All of that nuance, that moral complexity, is absent from this movie. Batman uses guns here. He kills LOTS of people. Same with Superman. He snapped General Zod’s neck in Man Of Steel, and stabs Doomsday to death in this one. If you’re a comic fan, and the idea of witnessing your heroes perform that level of violence bothers you, don’t go see this movie. It’ll probably traumatize you. Honestly, as I was watching this film, especially the Batman bits, I couldn’t help but be reminded of Frank Miller’s universally-reviled All-Star Batman And Robin series, in which the Dark Knight is a narcissistic, violence-loving asshole, who calls children “retarded,” and forces them to eat rats. Hell, the book’s most infamous line, “I’m the Goddamn Batman,” actually makes its way into this movie. I really don’t know how to feel about any film that gives homage to ASBAR.

But, all that aside, I did actually enjoy this movie. Yeah, some of the writing is bad, and yeah, it’s probably more violent than it should be, but it’s still well-acted, well-shot, and super exciting. And, more so than this, I want to see the other movies in the DC Cinematic Universe. I want to see Suicide Squad, Wonder Woman, and Green Lantern Corps. I want to see other artists, besides Zack Snyder, give us their interpretations of this material. There’s a lot of potential here, and I really hope audiences will let filmmakers unlock it by going to see this movie.

So, at the end of the day, though it does have flaws, I’d say that Batman V Superman is still a 7 out of 10. Please, please, please, go see it.

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